Utepils

Norwegian: to sit outside on a sunny day enjoying a beer.

Gattara

Italian: A woman, often old and lonely, who devotes herself to stray cats.

Tsundoku

Japanese: the act of leaving a book unread after buying it, typically piling it up together with other unread books

Language is a uniquely captivating subject, with vast differences in languages, dialect and accents. Speaking more than one language is great, however those multi linguists know that sometimes, there are just some words that are untranslatable to the English language.
Keep reading to discover some weird and wonderful words that can only be explained in long sentences in the English language.

Pochemuchka
This somewhat harsh sounding Russian word essentially means a person who asks too many questions.. Somewhat simpler than its English translation, Pochemuchka is a great word with a great meaning.

Tsundoku
A common Japanese word, Tsundoku means the act of leaving a book unread after buying it, typically piling it up together with other unread books. We’re sure many of you are guilty of this.

Tingo
This happy-sounding word from Easter Island actually means something a little more sinister. Translated to the best of its ability, Tingo is the act of taking objects one desires from the house of a friend by gradually borrowing all of them.

Prozvonit
This Czech word is a somewhat modern creation, and means to call a mobile phone but leave it to ring once so the other person will call back allowing the caller not to spend money on minutes.

Age-otori
If you’ve just visited the hairdresser, you won’t want to hear this word shouted across at you. Meaning to look worse for a haircut, Age-otori isn’t the most flattering Japanese phase.

Utepils
As the summer comes ever-closer, you may hear Utepils muttered by Norwegian friends. Meaning to sit outside on a sunny day enjoying a beer, it’s a good one to learn to impress your friends.

Friolero
If you’re one of those people who’s always cold, in Spanish, you’d be called a Friolero. Meaning a person who is especially sensitive to cold weather and temperatures, if this is you, you might want to consider a move to warmer climate – perhaps Spain or Mexico!

Gattara
The phrase ‘cat lady’ has become more poignant in recent years, and it seems the Italians are fans of the little furry creatures too. Translated to a woman, often old and lonely, who devotes herself to stray cats, Gattara sounds infinitely nicer than ‘cat lady’.

There are many more words that aren’t able to be translated into English, however these are just some of our favourites. Do you have any great examples to share that literally leave you stuck for words?

1 Comment

  1. Marcus Strallen

    2 more for the collection:

    Kaida

    A Nepali word used within the Brigade of Gurkhas to encapsulate all the loyalties, traditions and history that bind all soldiers to their particular regiment.

    Maridadi

    A Swahili adjective that conveys a meaning of colourful (almost gaudy) attractiveness.

    Reply

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